Ways You Can Save on Prescription Drugs

save on prescription drugs

The average older adult takes five or more medications each day, and some of these can be expensive.1 No one wants to decide between paying for groceries and paying for medicine, but it’s a choice some of us have to make every month. Does it have to be? Not necessarily. There may be ways you can save on your prescription drugs.

 

Check your insurance coverage

Medications covered by insurance are typically far more affordable than those that are not. Brand name and generic drugs covered by your insurance should be listed in your plan’s drug list, or formulary. Many plans list their formularies online. Call the number on the back of your insurance card if you have questions about whether or not a particular medication is covered.

If you take colchicine to prevent gout attacks2, for instance, you may be interested to know that Mitigare® (Colchicine) 0.6 mg Capsules and Generic Colchicine Capsules are covered by 82 percent of major health plans*, including:

  • United Health Group®
  • CVS Caremark Rx®
  • Cigna Health Plans, Inc.
  • AetnaSM
  • Express Scripts® PBM
  • CVS® SilverScript®
  • Most BCBS® Plans, State Medicaid and Wellcare Part D

 

Investigate generic options

Always ask your doctor if a generic version of your medicine is available. Although they often cost far less, generic medications work the same way and provide the same clinical benefit as their name-brand counterparts.3 Plus, many pharmacies in grocery stores and big-box retailers offer hundreds of generic medications for $10 or less.4 Be sure to ask for the generics list the next time you’re at the store (or look it up online). Different stores may carry different generics, so if you don’t see your medication on one store’s list, check another retailer.

 

Shop around

The prices of brand-name and generic medications can vary from pharmacy to pharmacy. Call stores in your area to find out which one has your medicine for the lowest cost. You can also try a computer or smartphone app such as GoodRx or WeRx to help you find the best price.

 

Learn about savings programs

Visit the websites associated with the medicines you take for coupons/co-pay cards (try typing the name of the drug you take and the words “copay card” or “savings card” into an online search engine such as Google). You may find that you can get your medicine for a much lower price when you sign up for an online savings program.

 

Check out the True Blue Savings Card

Adults who take Mitigare®, for example, can apply for the True Blue Savings Card. Eligible patients receive the first 30 days of Mitigare® for as little as $0 and refills for as little as $5 per month. To find out more about the True Blue Savings Program, visit Mitigare.com.

 

Review your Medicare plan

Medicare plans can change from year to year, including the copays, deductible amounts and drugs covered. Be sure to review your options using the personalized plan search on the Medicare website. Most people on Medicare can switch plans during the annual enrollment period, from October 15 through December 7.

 

Consider patient assistance programs

Prescription assistance programs are offered by a number of organizations, including Medicare, state government and nonprofit groups. To find out more, check out the National Council on Aging’s Benefits CheckUp®. This free online tool can help you determine if you’re eligible for patient assistance programs, including the Medicare Extra Help program.

 

*Managed Markets Insight & Technology, LLC database and formulary status as of January 2020.

†For all eligible patients 18 years or older who are legal residents of the United States or Puerto Rico. First 30 days are as little as $0 only for eligible patients. Maximum savings of $65 on the first fill and $50 on refills. Please see complete Terms and Conditions.

Reference to any products, services, hypertext link to the third parties or other information by trade name, trademark, supplier or otherwise does not constitute or imply its endorsement, sponsorship or recommendation by Hikma. Nor is endorsement of Hikma implied by such links. They are for reference only.

 

Mitigare® is a registered trademark of Hikma Pharmaceuticals USA Inc.

Benefits CheckUp® is a registered trademark of the National Council on Aging.

 

Important Safety Information

Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.

Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.

Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.

Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.

Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.

Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.

 

Please see the full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for Mitigare® for complete product details.

 

NOTE: This article was not written by a medical professional and is not intended to substitute for the guidance of a physician. These are not Hikma’s recommendations for gout flare prevention, but rather facts and data collected from various reliable medical sources. For a full list of resources and their attributing links, see below.

References

  1. 8 Tips to Save Money on Your Medications. My Medicare Matters®/National Council on Aging website. Available at: https://www.mymedicarematters.org/2017/04/8-tips-save-money-medications/. Accessed January 17, 2020.
  2. Borstad GC, Bryant LR, Abel MP, Scroggie DA, Harris MD Alloway JA. Colchicine for prophylaxis of acute flares when initiating allopurinol for chronic gouty arthritis. J Rheumatol. 2004 Dec;31(12):2429–2432.
  3. US Food and Drug Administration website. Generic Drugs: Questions and Answers. Available at: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/questions-answers/generic-drugs-questions-answers. Accessed January 17, 2020.
  4. 7 ways to save cash on prescription drugs. Harvard Health Publishing/Harvard Medical School website. Available at: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/7-ways-save-cash-prescription-drugs-2017051811638. Accessed January 17, 2020.

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.
  • Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.
  • Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.
  • Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.
  • Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.
  • The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Indication

Mitigare® is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares in adults. The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied.

Mitigare® is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

For Full Prescribing Information please CLICK HERE and for Medication Guide CLICK HERE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Manufactured by: West-Ward Columbus Inc., Columbus, OH 43228

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.