Don’t Let Gout Get You Down—Get the Gout Treatment You Need and Deserve

gout treatment

Gout is a common form of inflammatory arthritis that affects more than 8 million Americans.1 Unfortunately, fewer than one in three people who have it are getting the gout treatment they need.2 If you have gout, it is important to take it just as seriously as you would any other health issue.2 Visit your doctor, get the treatment you need and deserve and above all, don’t let gout get you down.

 

Review the latest research

A recent survey conducted by the Gout Education Society revealed that fewer than a third of people with gout are getting the gout treatment they need to avoid flares and complications.2 This is troubling, because according to N Lawrence Edwards MD, MACP, MACR, chairman of the Gout Education Society, “Gout is an extremely destructive disease that needs to be addressed year-round—not just during flares … there is low awareness of the long-term health implications for gout, including the link to other comorbid health issues.”3

 

Learn the truth

Eighty-four percent of people with gout agree that it is a very serious health issue that requires ongoing treatment and management.2 However, a significant stigma remains. More than two-thirds of gout patients—and half of Americans overall—believe that gout is “an embarrassing disease.”2 Although gout historically has been considered a disease of excess, this notion is not necessarily accurate. What many people don’t know is that recent research has shown that heredity may contribute more to the risk of gout than diet.4,5

 

Recognize the impact

Because most patients aren’t getting the gout treatment they need, the disease is taking a serious toll not just on their health, but on their lives in general.2 According to the survey, people with gout suffer with more than just health problems like kidney and heart disease—they also deal with depression, poor quality of life and lost time from work.2 Here are some key facts and figures2:

  • Four in 10 patients say their quality of life is not as good because of gout
  • One in four patients feels like gout controls his or her life
  • One in four patients feels isolated or alone in his or her struggles
  • One in four patients frequently misses work because of gout

 

Understand the pain

If you’ve never had a gout attack, it might be difficult to imagine what it feels like. People with gout compare their gout flares to some of the most painful conditions a person can endure.2 Respondents to the Gout Education Society survey made these comparisons to the pain of a gout flare2:

  • 39% said that a gout flare is more painful than a severe burn
  • 36% said that a gout flare is more painful than kidney stones
  • 34% said that a gout flare is more painful than breaking a bone
  • 29% said that a gout flare is more painful than childbirth
  • 25% said that a gout flare is more painful than being hit by a car

Nearly 1 in 5 respondents said nothing is more painful than a gout flare.2

 

Talk with your doctor about gout and gout treatment

If you suspect you have gout but have not yet been diagnosed, make an appointment with your doctor. One way to prepare for your visit is by downloading and completing the Gout Flare Questionnaire (from Resources for Patients).

If you have already been diagnosed with gout and are suffering with frequent flares, ask your doctor these questions about gout treatment:

  • What is my serum uric acid level?
  • What can I do to help control my uric acid level?
  • Is there any way to prevent gout flares?
  • What can I do to prevent my gout from getting worse?

 

Respect yourself and your health

When it comes to your health, it’s important to be your own advocate. Educate yourself about gout, don’t be afraid to ask questions and be sure to communicate clearly with your healthcare providers. It’s your health and your life. Take control.

 

NOTE: This article was not written by a medical professional and is not intended to substitute for the guidance of a physician. These are not Hikma’s recommendations for gout flare prevention, but rather facts and data collected from various reliable medical sources. For a full list of resources and their attributing links, see below.

References

  1. Zhu Y et al. Prevalence of Gout and Hyperuricemia in the US General Population. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2008. Arthritis Rheum. 2011;63(10):3136–3141.
  2. Cision PR Newswire website. Gout Patients Bear a Tremendous Burden, Research Reveals/Gout Education Society Survey Addresses Gout Toll and Stigma. Available at: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/gout-patients-bear-a-tremendous-burden-research-reveals-300854747.html. Accessed August 2, 2019.
  3. Cision PR Newswire website. New Research Reinforces Gout Burden, Need for Education/Gout & Uric Acid Education Society Survey Finds Nine in 10 Gout Sufferers Are “Majorly Inconvenienced” by the disease, but Fewer than Half Take Steps to Manage It. Available at: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-research-reinforces-gout-burden-need-for-education-300270328.html". Accessed August 2, 2019.
  4. Higashino T, Takada T, Nakaoka H, et al. Multiple common and rare variants of ABCG2 cause gout. RMD Open. 2017;3:e000464.
  5. Chang S-J, Chen C-J, et al. ABCG2 contributes to the development of gout and hyperuricemia in a genome-wide association study. Nature/Scientific Reports. 2018;8:3137.

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.
  • Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.
  • Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.
  • Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.
  • Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.
  • The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Indication

Mitigare® is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares in adults. The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied.

Mitigare® is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

For Full Prescribing Information please CLICK HERE and for Medication Guide CLICK HERE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Manufactured by: West-Ward Columbus Inc., Columbus, OH 43228

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4.