Exploring lifestyle tips like these are among the many things you can do to help prevent flares. It is very important to follow your doctor’s advice and take medicine as prescribed. Our Gout Prevention Blog is another resource for information.

Quick Tips List

  • Drink more water.1 Staying hydrated may help to prevent gout flares. Aim for at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water each day.
  • Limit alcohol.1 Alcohol may raise your risk of a gout flare because it is high in purines. Purines are naturally occurring substances found in many foods and drinks.
  • Avoid foods containing purines.2 Foods that are high in purines include red meat, organ meats and certain kinds of seafood (including anchovies, herring, sardines, mussels, scallops, trout, haddock, mackerel and tuna).
  • Eat a healthy diet.1 A person who has gout should follow the same balanced, healthy diet as a person who does not have gout. Be sure to eat plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Limit your intake of lean meat, fish and poultry to four to six ounces daily. Add protein to your diet by consuming low-fat or fat-free dairy products (including unsweetened yogurt, skim milk, and cottage cheese).
  • Exercise.1 Exercise regularly and maintain a healthy body weight. Be cautious when exercising with a joint that is inflamed. Doing so can prolong the inflammation and make the pain worse. Always get your doctor’s approval before beginning an exercise program.
  • Lose weight if you need to.1 Being overweight increases your risk of developing gout. Losing weight decreases your risk of developing gout. It also reduces the overall stress on your joints.
  • Educate yourself. One of the best ways to manage your gout is to learn more about it. Ask your doctor for information about gout or visit the websites of independent organizations with content written by healthcare professionals, including:

For many other tips and informative gout flare prevention guidance, you can also visit the Mitigare® Gout Blog.

References

  1. . Mayo Clinic website. Gout diet: What’s allowed, what’s not. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/art-20048524. Accessed May 23, 2017.
  2. . Questions and Answers about Gout. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases website. Available at: https://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/gout/. Accessed May 16, 2017.

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.
  • Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.
  • Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.
  • Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.
  • Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.
  • The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Indication

Mitigare® is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares in adults. The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied.

Mitigare® is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

For Full Prescribing Information please CLICK HERE and for Medication Guide CLICK HERE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Manufactured by: West-Ward Columbus Inc., Columbus, OH 43228

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.