Caring For Your Loved One With Gout

caring for your loved one with gout

As excruciating as gout flares can be1, it’s almost as painful to watch someone else suffer with them—especially someone you care about. Fortunately, there are many ways to provide support and help make life better for someone with gout. Read on to learn more about caring for your loved one with gout.

 

Learn about the disease

Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis caused by excess uric acid in the bloodstream.1 When the uric acid reaches a certain level, urate crystals can form in the joints.1 Eventually, these crystals can cause bouts of swelling, redness and intense pain called flares.1

Gout flares usually come on quickly—often in the middle of the night—and the resulting discomfort can linger for several days.1 After the first flare, 62 percent of people will experience another one within the year and 78 percent will experience another one within the next two years.2 Without treatment, gout flares become more severe and affect more than one joint at a time.3

 

Recognize that heredity may be a factor

Although gout historically has been considered a disease of excess, this notion may not necessarily be accurate. Recent research conducted in Taiwan and Japan found that heredity contributes more to your risk of gout than diet.4,5 Unfortunately, however, many people with gout are stigmatized due to the misconception that the disease is caused by eating and drinking too much.6 For some, the shame associated with the disease prevents them from seeking the medical help they need.6

 

Encourage healthy habits

One important way to support your loved one with gout is to encourage him or her to embrace a healthy lifestyle.7 Ask your loved one to join you for a walk.7 Cook a healthy meal you’ll both enjoy.7 And if you live together, stock your kitchen with healthy foods and beverages.7 Although genetics play a big role in the development of gout, adopting a healthy lifestyle is key to living better with the disease.4,5,7

 

Visit the doctor

Although more than 8 million Americans suffer with gout, only about 10 percent of them actually receive the gout treatment they need.8 If your loved one suspects he or she has gout but has not yet been diagnosed, suggest a visit to the doctor. Help him or her prepare for the appointment by downloading and completing the Gout Flare Questionnaire (from resources for patients). You might also encourage your loved one to ask the doctor these questions:

  • What is my serum uric acid level?
  • What can I do to help control my uric acid level?
  • Is there any way to prevent gout flares?
  • What can I do to prevent my gout from getting worse?

 

Stay positive

Lasting changes don’t usually happen overnight, so patience is key. Your support is also important. Encourage your loved one to take the process one step at a time. And above all, be sure to acknowledge their efforts and celebrate their achievements along the way.

 

NOTE: This article was not written by a medical professional and is not intended to substitute for the guidance of a physician. These are not Hikma’s recommendations for gout flare prevention, but rather facts and data collected from various reliable medical sources. For a full list of resources and their attributing links, see below.

References

  1. Gout/Symptoms & causes. Mayo Clinic website. Available at: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gout/symptoms-causes/syc-20372897. Accessed 5/1/19.
  2. Yu TF, Gutman AB. Efficacy of colchicine prophylaxis in gout. Prevention of recurrent gouty arthritis over a mean period of five years in 208 gouty subjects. Ann Intern Med. 1961;55:179-192.
  3. Gout. OrthoInfo from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons website. Available at: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/gout/. Accessed 4/1/19.
  4. Higashino T, Takada T, Nakaoka H, et al. Multiple common and rare variants of ABCG2 cause gout. RMD Open. 2017;3:e000464.
  5. Chang S-J, Chen C-J, et al. ABCG2 contributes to the development of gout and hyperuricemia in a genome-wide association study. Nature/Scientific Reports. 2018;8:3137.
  6. Nicola Dalbeth and Keith J Petrie: It’s time to change the name of gout. The British Medical Journal Opinion/Comment and opinion from the BMJ’s international community of readers, authors, and editors. Available at: https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2018/02/05/nicola-dalbeth-and-keith-j-petrie-its-time-to-change-the-name-of-gout/. Accessed 5/1/19.
  7. Gout/Diagnosis. Mayo Clinic website. Available at: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gout/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20372903. Accessed 5/1/19.
  8. What is Gout? Gout Education Society website. Available at: http://gouteducation.org/what-is-gout/. Accessed 5/1/19.

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.
  • Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.
  • Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.
  • Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.
  • Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.
  • The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Indication

Mitigare® is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares in adults. The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied.

Mitigare® is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

For Full Prescribing Information please CLICK HERE and for Medication Guide CLICK HERE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Manufactured by: West-Ward Columbus Inc., Columbus, OH 43228

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.