Cooking Gout-Friendly Meals at Home

gout-friendly meals

Dining out certainly has its advantages—a wide variety of menu options, no chopping or sautéing and zero cleanup to name a few. But dining in has advantages, too. You probably know that cooking at home can be better than ordering out for both your wallet and your waistline. But did you know that cooking gout-friendly meals at home may also reduce your risk of flares?

 

The connection between food and gout flares

For centuries, diet was believed to be the primary cause of gout.1 However, recent research has shown that heredity plays a bigger role in the risk of gout attacks than diet.2,3 Nonetheless, your food choices may still impact your risk of flares, as some foods are more likely than others to trigger painful attacks.4 Red meat, organ meats, certain types of seafood and beer are among the most well-known culprits.4

 

Foods and drinks to enjoy if you have gout

Purines are chemical compounds that occur naturally in our bodies and also are present in some foods and beverages.5 Uric acid is produced when the body breaks down purines.5 If you have gout, it’s best to eat gout-friendly meals that include mostly lower-purine foods.5 Consider adding these to your grocery list6,7:

  • Lean meat and poultry
  • Low-fat dairy products
  • Whole grain products
  • Beans/legumes
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Fruits (there is some evidence that eating cherries is associated with a lower risk of gout attacks)
  • Vegetables

 

Foods and drinks to avoid if you have gout

As you plan gout-friendly meals to cook at home, it’s important to keep in mind that some foods and drinks are associated with a higher risk of gout attacks than others.5 The next time you go to the grocery store, do your best to steer clear of these items6,7:

  • Red meat and organ meats (eg, liver, tongue, sweetbreads)
  • Shellfish (eg, shrimp, lobster)
  • Refined carbohydrate products (eg, white bread, white rice, pasta, sugar)
  • Processed foods (eg, chips, snack foods, frozen dinners)
  • Sugary/sweet beverages
  • Alcoholic beverages

 

Gout-friendly recipes to try

Use your favorite Internet search engine to discover lower-purine recipes that are appropriate for people with gout. One source is the list of gout-friendly recipes on the Johns Hopkins Medicine website. There you’ll find dozens of delicious, easy-to-prepare dishes that everyone can enjoy—regardless of whether or not they suffer with gout.

 

Important tips for managing gout

In addition to eating a low-purine diet, there are many things you can do to take good care of yourself as you manage your gout:

  • Drink plenty of water—Drinking at least 8 glasses of water each day helps flush uric acid from your system.8
  • Maintain a healthy weight—Losing weight (if you need to) may help reduce the amount of uric acid in your bloodstream.9 (Avoid rapid weight loss or fasting, however, as these may temporarily increase your uric acid level.9)
  • Take medications as directed—According to the Mayo Clinic, medication is often the most effective way to treat gout and prevent flares.10
  • Visit your doctor regularly—Take an active role in your care by seeing your doctor as scheduled and following your treatment plan.4 This especially important if you have other medical conditions such as heart disease or diabetes.4

 

Gout Friendly Diet Cheat Sheet

Discover the benefits of a gout-friendly diet that may reduce your risk of future flares.
INFOGRAPHIC

NOTE: This article was not written by a medical professional and is not intended to substitute for the guidance of a physician. These are not Hikma’s recommendations for gout flare prevention, but rather facts and data collected from various reliable medical sources. For a full list of resources and their attributing links, see below.

References

  1. Nicola Dalbeth and Keith J Petrie: It’s time to change the name of gout. The British Medical Journal Opinion/Comment and opinion from the BMJ’s international community of readers, authors, and editors. Available at: https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2018/02/05/nicola-dalbeth-and-keith-j-petrie-its-time-to-change-the-name-of-gout/. Accessed August 16, 2020.
  2. Higashino T, Takada T, Nakaoka H, et al. Multiple common and rare variants of ABCG2 cause gout. RMD Open. 2017;3:e000464.
  3. Chang S-J, Chen C-J, et al. ABCG2 contributes to the development of gout and hyperuricemia in a genome-wide association study. Nature/Scientific Reports. 2018;8:3137.
  4. Gout. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/gout.html. Accessed August 16, 2020.
  5. Which Foods Are Safe for Gout? Arthritis Foundation website. Available at: https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-eating/which-foods-are-safe-for-gout/a>. Accessed August 16, 2020.
  6. Shopping List for Gout. Arthritis Foundation website. Available at: https://www.arthritis.org/diseases/more-about/shopping-list-for-gout. Accessed August 16, 2020.
  7. Healthy Lifestyle/Nutrition and healthy eating/Gout diet: what’s allowed, what’s not. Mayo Clinic website. Available at: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/gout-diet/art-20048524. Accessed August 16, 2020.
  8. Gout Diet: Dos and Don’ts. Arthritis Foundation website. Available at: https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-eating/gout-diet-dos-and-donts. Accessed August 16, 2020.
  9. Gout/Symptoms & causes. Mayo Clinic website. Available at: https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-eating/gout-diet-dos-and-donts. Accessed August 16, 2020.
  10. Gout/Diagnosis & treatment. Mayo Clinic website. Available at: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gout/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20372903. Accessed August 16, 2020.

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.
  • Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.
  • Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.
  • Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.
  • Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.
  • The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Indication

Mitigare® is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares in adults. The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied.

Mitigare® is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

For Full Prescribing Information please CLICK HERE and for Medication Guide CLICK HERE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Manufactured by: West-Ward Columbus Inc., Columbus, OH 43228

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4.