Shoes for Gout: What is the Best Footwear if I Have Gout in My Feet?

shoes for gout

Almost everyone knows how uncomfortable it is to wear shoes that don’t fit properly. And many of us are guilty of trading comfort and function for style from time to time. But if you have gout in your feet, you probably understand how critical it is to wear the best shoes for gout.

 

Understanding gout

Gout is a painful type of inflammatory arthritis that is caused by the build-up of uric acid crystals in the joints.1 Adults with gout can suffer from attacks (also called flares), which include sudden episodes of pain, redness, swelling and/or extreme tenderness in one or more joints.2 Although gout can affect the joints in the elbows, wrists, fingers, knees and ankles, it often appears first in the feet, especially the big toe.2

 

Preventing flares with medication

If you have gout, you may take a uric-acid lowering therapy (ULT) such as allopurinol, Uloric (febuxostat), Zurampic® (lesinurad), Krystexxa® (pegloticase) or Duzallo® (lesurinad and allopurinol).3–7 You might also take Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules to help prevent gout flares.8 The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied. Mitigare is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes. The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Talk to your doctor about the gout flare prevention strategy that may be right for you.

While ULTs have been shown to reduce uric acid and Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules have been proven to help prevent gout flares in adults3–8, recent studies show that wearing the right kind of footwear may make a difference for people with gout as well9–11.

 

Why footwear matters

If you are living with gout, you may have had at least one gout flare in your feet. Keith Rome, PhD, professor of podiatry at Auckland (New Zealand) University of Technology (AUT), claims that wearing the proper shoes may help people with gout reduce the amount of pain, impairment and disability they experience as a result of the disease.9

 

Footwear research

Dr. Rome led the very first study to determine whether wearing the proper footwear could reduce foot pain and impairment in people with gout.9 He and his group observed that shoes with adequate motion control (i.e., the ability of a shoe to hold the foot in place), cushioning and stability may be helpful in reducing foot pain and disability in people with gout.9

Another study of gout patients with moderate to severe foot pain, impairment and disability was published about a year later by Sarah Stewart, PhD, also of AUT.10 This study found that wearing the proper shoes for gout can promote a more efficient stride and thus may help reduce foot pain and foot-related problems.10

 

Best shoes for gout

Based on this research, the best type of footwear for people with gout is a sturdy shoe that offers appropriate support, motion control and cushioning.9,11 Examples include:

  • Athletic or running shoes
  • Walking shoes
  • Oxfords
  • Orthopedic shoes

 

Worst shoes for gout

Adults who experience gout flares should avoid flimsy footwear that lacks support and adequate cushioning, including9,11:

  • High heels
  • Flip-flops
  • Sandals
  • Lightweight plastic clogs
  • Moccasins

 

Talk with your doctor

According to Dr. Rome, footwear should be considered part of the management plan for people with gout.9 If you have questions about the best shoes for gout, talk with your doctor. Your doctor can make the best recommendation based on your individual case.

 

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NOTE: This article was not written by a medical professional and is not intended to substitute for the guidance of a physician. These are not Hikma’s recommendations for gout flare prevention, but rather facts and data collected from various reliable medical sources. For a full list of resources and their attributing links, see below.

References

  1. Zhu Y et al. Prevalence of Gout and Hyperuricemia in the US General Population. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2008. Arthritis Rheum. 2011;63(10):3136–3141.
  2. Mayo Clinic. Patient Care & Health Information/Diseases & Conditions/Gout/Symptoms & causes. Available at: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gout/symptoms-causes/syc-20372897. Accessed August 31, 2018.
  3. Allopurinol Tablets, USP [prescribing information]. Memphis, TN: Northstar Healthcare Holdings; 2016.
  4. Uloric (febuxostat) [prescribing information]. Deerfield, IL: Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc; 2013.
  5. ZURAMPIC® (lesinurad) [prescribing information]. Wilmington, DE: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP; 2015.
  6. KRYSTEXXA® (pegloticase injection) [prescribing information]. Lake Forest, IL: Horizon Pharma Rheumatology LLC; 2016.
  7. DUZALLO® (lesurinad and allopurinol) tablets [prescribing information]. Sodertalje, Sweden: AstraZeneca AB; 2017.
  8. Mitigare® (colchicine) capsules [prescribing information]. Columbus, OH: West-Ward Columbus, Inc.; 2018.
  9. Rome et al. The effects of commercially available footwear on foot pain and disability in people with gout: a pilot study. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders. 2013;14:278–287
  10. Arthritis Foundation™. Living With Arthritis Blog. Find the Best and Worst Shoes for Arthritis. Available at: http://blog.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/shoes-for-arthritis/. Accessed August 31, 2018.
  11. Stewart S et al. The effect of good and poor walking shoe characteristics on plantar pressure and gain in people with gout. Clin Biomech. 2014;29(10):1158–1163.

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.
  • Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.
  • Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.
  • Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.
  • Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.
  • The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Indication

Mitigare® is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares in adults. The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied.

Mitigare® is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

For Full Prescribing Information please CLICK HERE and for Medication Guide CLICK HERE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Manufactured by: West-Ward Columbus Inc., Columbus, OH 43228

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.