Summer Shoes for Gout: What Should I Look for if I Have Gout in My Feet?

summer shoes for gout

Ah, summer. Finally time to put away the heavy coats and trade in boots for summer kicks. But what are the best summer shoes for gout? And what should you look for in a summer shoe if you have gout in your feet?

 

Why the right shoes make a difference

If you’ve ever had a gout attack in your foot, you understand how intense the pain can be.1 But did you know that wearing the right shoes may make a big difference?2 According to a study published by Keith Rome, PhD, professor of podiatry at Auckland (New Zealand) University of Technology (AUT) and his colleagues, shoes with adequate motion control (ie, the ability to hold the foot in place), cushioning and stability may help to reduce foot pain and disability in people with gout.2

 

How to shop for summer shoes for gout

Unfortunately, the latest research indicates that what most of us think of as “summer shoes”—flip-flops and sandals—are not the best choices for people with gout.2,3 But if you can’t bear the thought of spending your entire summer in athletic shoes, consider the advice of Muir Orthopaedic Specialists, a foot care practice in Northern California.4 Aligned with Dr. Rome’s findings, the practice recommends that consumers look for four things when buying shoes4:

  • Arch support
  • Sturdy soles
  • Cushioned heel
  • Low or no heel

If you’re considering sandals, make sure they have straps—especially across the top of the foot and the back of the ankle.4 Straps are key because they can give your foot a bit more stability. 4 If they’re adjustable, straps may also help you achieve a more precise fit.5

 

In what other ways can I protect my feet in summer?

In addition to wearing the right kind of footwear, consider these other ways you can protect your feet in the warmer months6:

  • Don’t go barefoot—going without shoes can increase your risk of injury, sunburn and exposure to fungal and bacterial infections.
  • Keep blister pads and/or moleskin on hand to protect against foot irritation.
  • Stay hydrated—drinking plenty of water is good for your overall health and may help minimize any foot swelling caused by the heat.
  • Have adhesive bandages and antibiotic ointment available to treat minor cuts and scrapes.
  • Keep blood flowing by flexing your ankles, wiggling your toes and stretching your calves from time to time.

 

When to call the doctor

If you have gout and suffer frequent flares, make an appointment to see your doctor as soon as you can. He or she can offer you gout management options that best meet your individual needs. These options may include urate-lowering therapy (ULT) to treat the underlying cause of your gout and a colchicine product such as Mitigare® (Colchicine) 0.6 mg Capsules or Generic Colchicine Capsules to help prevent flares.7,8 Consider downloading and completing the Gout Flare Questionnaire (from Resources for Patients) before your appointment.

 

Mitigare® is a registered trademark of Hikma Pharmaceuticals USA Inc.

 

Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.

Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.

Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.

Monitor for toxicity and, if present, consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.

Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.

Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.

The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

 

Please see the full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for Mitigare® for complete product details.

 

NOTE: This article was not written by a medical professional and is not intended to substitute for the guidance of a physician. These are not Hikma’s recommendations for gout flare prevention, but rather facts and data collected from various reliable medical sources. For a full list of resources and their attributing links, see below.

References

  1. Gout/Symptoms & causes. Mayo Clinic website. Available at: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gout/symptoms-causes/syc-2037289. Accessed April 20, 2020.
  2. Rome et al. The effects of commercially available footwear on foot pain and disability in people with gout: a pilot study. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders. 2013;14:278–287.
  3. Stewart S et al. The effect of good and poor walking shoe characteristics on plantar pressure and gain in people with gout. Clin Biomech. 2014;29(10):1158–1163.
  4. Are your summer sandals causing foot and heel pain? Muir Orthopaedic Specialists website. Available at: https://www.muirortho.com/orthopedic-blog/2019/july/are-your-summer-sandals-causing-foot-and-heel-pa/. Accessed April 20, 2020.
  5. Find the Best and Worst Shoes for Arthritis. Arthritis Foundation website. Available at: http://blog.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/shoes-for-arthritis/. Accessed April 20, 2020.
  6. Summer Foot Care. American Podiatric Medical Association. Available at: https://www.apma.org/Patients/HealthyFeetTips.cfm?ItemNumber=9860. Accessed April 20, 2020.
  7. Khanna D, Khanna PP, Fitzgerald JD, et al. 2012 American College of Rheumatology Guidelines for Management of Gout. Part 2: Therapy and Antiinflammatory Prophylaxis of Acute Gouty Arthritis. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012;64:1447–1451 and 1456–1459.
  8. Mitigare® (Colchicine) 0.6 mg Capsules [prescribing information]. Columbus, OH: West-ward Columbus, Inc.; 2019.

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.
  • Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.
  • Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.
  • Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.
  • Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.
  • The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Indication

Mitigare® is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares in adults. The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied.

Mitigare® is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

For Full Prescribing Information please CLICK HERE and for Medication Guide CLICK HERE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Manufactured by: West-Ward Columbus Inc., Columbus, OH 43228

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4.