How Can I Stay Active When I Have Gout?

As you’ve probably heard from your doctor, regular exercise is an important part of staying healthy long-term.1 Among other benefits, physical activity can help you increase your strength and flexibility, relieve stress and boost your self-esteem.1 But staying active can be challenging when you have gout. You might agree that it sounds like a good idea, but you may have also asked yourself, “How can I stay active when I have gout?”

 

Exercise is for everyone

Regular physical activity is very important, and having limited mobility due to gout does not mean you cannot exercise. Plus, physical activity does not have to be strenuous to be beneficial.1 Some good forms of exercise for older people and/or people with limited mobility include:

  • Yoga and/or Pilates2—Both yoga and Pilates can help you strengthen and build muscle. They can also help you improve your flexibility.
  • Water exercise2—Swimming, water exercise and water aerobics are especially good for people who suffer with weak or damaged joints.
  • Resistance training3—Resistance training can help you build strength, improve stamina and prevent falls.
  • Walking2,3—Walking has been shown to have both physical and mental benefits. In addition to burning calories, it can help you reduce stress and boost your confidence.
  • Rowing2—Rowing provides a low-impact cardio and resistance workout for the entire body that can be adjusted to almost any fitness level.
  • Tai Chi2—A combination of movement and meditation, this Chinese martial art may help increase your strength and flexibility as well as improve your cognitive function.

 

Talk with your doctor before you start

Before you begin any exercise program, be sure to talk with your doctor.1,3 Ask what types of exercise(s) is/are best for you, and if there are any activities you should avoid. You’ll also want to find out how often you should exercise. Work together to set short-term and long-term activity goals.

 

Avoid exercise during a gout attack or gout flare

Although it’s important to get regular physical activity, you should never try to exercise during a gout flare or gout attack.4 Ask your doctor how soon you may resume your routine once your symptoms have subsided.

 

Take it slow, especially at first

Always go at your own pace. You may find it easier to exercise some days than others, and that is completely normal. Also be sure to keep your goals manageable. Reaching even small fitness goals may help you to feel more confident and help you to stay motivated.

 

Stay positive

Exercise is an investment in yourself, and you are worth it! As you become more active, be sure to continue to eat healthfully, get plenty of rest, take your medications as prescribed and see your doctor regularly.

 

NOTE: This article was not written by a medical professional and is not intended is to substitute for the guidance of a physician. These are not Hikma’s recommendations for gout flare prevention, but rather facts and data collected from various reliable medical sources. For a full list of resources and their attributing links, see below.

References

  1. Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General/Persons with Disabilities. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/sgr/disab.htm. Accessed 3/25/19.
  2. 6 Exercises for People with Limited Mobility. A Healthier Michigan website. Available at: https://www.ahealthiermichigan.org/2019/01/28/6-exercises-for-people-with-limited-mobility/. Accessed 3/25/19.
  3. Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General/Older Adults. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/sgr/olderad.htm. Accessed 3/25/19.
  4. Gout. OrthoInfo from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons website. Available at: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/gout/. Accessed 3/25/19.

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.
  • Blood dyscrasias such as myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.
  • Monitor for toxicity and if present consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of colchicine.
  • Drug interaction with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors: Co-administration of colchicine with dual P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors has resulted in life-threatening interactions and death.
  • Neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis may occur with chronic treatment with colchicine in therapeutic doses, especially in combination with other drugs known to cause this effect. Patients with impaired renal function and elderly patients (including those with normal renal and hepatic function) are at increased risk. Consider temporary interruption or discontinuation of Mitigare®.
  • The most commonly reported adverse reactions with colchicine are gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Indication

Mitigare® is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares in adults. The safety and effectiveness of Mitigare for acute treatment of gout flares during prophylaxis has not been studied.

Mitigare® is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

For Full Prescribing Information please CLICK HERE and for Medication Guide CLICK HERE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Manufactured by: West-Ward Columbus Inc., Columbus, OH 43228

Important Safety Information for Mitigare® (colchicine) 0.6 mg capsules

  • Colchicine 0.6 mg capsules are contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment who are currently prescribed drugs that inhibit both P-gp and CYP3A4. Combining these dual inhibitors with colchicine in patients with renal or hepatic impairment has resulted in life-threatening or fatal colchicine toxicity. Patients with both renal and hepatic impairment should not be given Mitigare®.
  • Fatal overdoses have been reported with colchicine in adults and children. Keep Mitigare® out of the reach of children.